Rhian Thoms

Art and Ceramics

530 notes

letsplaymormor:

I’m here to tell you guys about a film I am completely and utterly psyched for.

As some of you may know, I’m Welsh, and as many more of you know, I’m queer. This film is frighteningly important to me.

Way back in the 1980s under Thatcher’s government, the mining industry was under threat. Pride is the story of the LGBT activists who stepped up to the mark and raised money for mining families despite hostility and oppression. 

The film explores a dated culture and an attitude prevalent even in contemporary society. What’s more, it explores a beautiful union of opposing communities, in a blunt, unashamed, humorous, way.

This film is so important. It’s a true story. It’s fantastic queer representation. And it comes out today. 

THERE IS NOT ENOUGH HYPE ABOUT THIS FILM.

12/09/2014

Go and watch this film, I beg of you. 

If that doesn’t convince you, it’s even got Andrew Scott. 

Trailer can also be found here. [x]

(via queermediarepresentation)

1,649 notes

girlsgetbusyzine:

Girls Get Busy #22 is finally finished and available online for free HERE

Featuring: Chanelle Adams, Kani Anifowoshi, Monika Ardila, Braudie Blais-Billie, Liz Bowen, Carlin Brown, Dana Burns, Alexandra Bussiere, Emily Smit-Dicks, Maggie Dunlap, Monika Forsberg, Forty Elephants Mob, Mariah Friere, Charlotte Gaffney, Miriam Galea, Emma Gruner, Caitlin Hazell, Hinni Huttunen, Jazmin Jones, Melissa Jones, India K, Aisling Keavey, Olivia Lawler, Lora Li, Maja Malou Lyse, Moira MacLean-Wideman, Nelly Matorina, Ilenia Madelaire, Melissa McElhose, Carol-Anne McFarlane, Madeleine Meunier, Pema Monaghan, Aditi Nagrath, Nuie, Katie Honan Pellico, Laurence Philomene, The Phoney Club, Christina Poku, Rhea Ramakrishnan, Louise Reimer, Leyla Grace Reynolds, Cornelia Van Rijswijk, Elisha Van Rijswijk, Nyssa Sharp, Hannah Siegfied, Beth Siveyer, Nandi La Sophia, Christina Svenson, Elis Talis, Rhian Thoms, Andrea Tirrell, Barbora Togel, Alexandra Urbina, Lin VanderVliet, Emily J. Wang, Haley Winkle

📖 🎨 📖

Curated by Beth Siveyer. Cover art by Nyssa Sharp

Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports artists, writers and musicians.

601 notes

archiemcphee:

Here’s some electrifyingly awesome fashion design that would’ve made Nikola Tesla proud. Dutch designer Anouk Wipprecht created (and modeled) this stunning Faraday Cage Dress, a metal garment capable of conducting nearly one million volts of electricity. The dress is made of metal plates, 600 rings of chain mail, plasma ball epaulets and a helmet covered in metal spikes with a protective face grill.

To construct and successfully model the dress Wipprecht collaborated with ArcAttack, an Austin, TX-based performance art group who use Tesla coils and Faraday suits as part of their act. Wipprecht modeled her Faraday Cage Dress in a dazzling performance at the 2014 Bay Area Maker Faire in May:

"Standing stalwartly between a pair of Tesla coils, electricity arcing around her to the strains of In the Hall of the Mountain King by ArcAttack, Wipprecht remained safe in the confines of her homemade Faraday cage, which distributed the electrical charge around its exterior while shielding the contents within.”

Click here for video footage of the performance, including Anouk Wipprecht’s perspective from inside the suit.

If you’re interested in knowing more about how this phenomenal garment was made, Wipprecht wrote all about it in a detailed Instructables post entitled “How to Get Fashionably Struck by Lightning.” However she cautions amateurs against trying to reproduce the dress one their own:

"If the arcs raise through your heart, you might not live to tell, so if anything, this process was done very carefully," she said. "ArcAttack have been doing this for over 12 years and are specialists in their field."

Head over to Instructables to learn more about this astounding project.

[via Inhabitat and ecouterre]

3,745 notes

archiemcphee:

British-born, Italy-based sculptor Matthew Simmonds is an art-historian-turned-stone-carver who sculpts beautiful architectural interiors inside rough pieces of marble and stone. His pieces look like miniature classical monuments and temples, empty of people, but full of intricate details.

“To create a sculpture that catches the light and structure of a building and lets the eye wander, to feel that here my eye could live, here a part of me could stay, is a great achievement,“ writes Simmonds. “The sculptures give the viewer a different perspective on space. They look different from every viewpoint. You long to be in them, and they seem almost more meaningful for that.“

To view more of Matthew Simmonds’ intricate sculptures click here.

[via Colossal]