Rhian Thoms

Art and Ceramics

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arpeggia:

Louise Bourgeois & Tracey Emin - Do Not Abandon Me, 2009-2010

Do Not Abandon Me is a collaboration between Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin consisting of sixteen intimate works made over the past two years. These drawings articulate physical drives and feelings, candidly confronting themes of identity, sexuality and the fear of loss and abandonment through joint expression.

This series originated with Bourgeois, who began the works by painting male and female torsos in profile on paper, mixing red, blue and black gouache pigments with water to create delicate and fluid silhouettes. Bourgeois then passed the images on to Emin, who later confessed: ‘I carried the images around the world with me from Australia to France, but I was too scared to touch them’. Emin overlaid Bourgeois’s forms with fantasy, drawing smaller figures that engaged with the torsos like Lilliputian lovers, enacting the body’s desires and anxieties. In one, a woman kisses an erect phallus; in another, a small fetus-like form protrudes from a swollen belly. In many, Emin’s handwriting inscribes the images with a narrative, putting into words the emotions expressed in Bourgeois’s vibrant gouaches.

This suite of prints was one of the last projects Louise Bourgeois completed before her death. They were then printed at Dye-namix studio in New York with archival dyes on cloth in an edition of 18 sets with 6 artist proofs. The exhibition travels to Hauser & Wirth from Carolina Nitsch Project Room, New York, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.

(via arabellesicardi)

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artchipel:

Bing Wright (b.1958, USA) - Broken Mirror/Evening Sky (2012)

Broken Mirror/Evening Sky is a new series of striking landscape photographs by New York based artist Bing Wright. Departing from his usual pared down images in grey palettes, Wright offers us moving skyscape photographs of richly colored sunsets reflected onto broken mirrors. This new body of work marks his first return to color photography in almost a decade.

The images are meticulously constructed through a combination of traditional documentary landscape photographs and the subtle manipulations of an image in the studio. Wright photographs sunsets, then projects the images onto mirrors he has broken in the studio. The mirrors are small, measuring just 14 x 11 inches. The artist re-photographs the reflection and then enlarges the image into a large scale format. This beautiful series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure. While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (src. James Harris Gallery)

© All images courtesy the artist

[more Bing Wright | artist found at mymodernmet]

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epruitt:

Artist Ronit Baranga

Israeili Artist Ronit Baranga, b. 1973, uses clay and porcelain to craft her sculptures.  Baranga’s process mainly involves using different kinds of clays such as liquid and solid clays for sculpting.

Baranga’s work is on the border between concrete and unreal life.  This border allows her to express complex emotional feelings by creating anthropomorphic images- human and inanimate objects- combined as one (cups on fingers; masks with human mouths; hollowed, headless figures wearing masks; tea drinking ceremony using empty cups).  “I believe that this combination in my art makes people feel. Viewers of my work react almost instantly- they are either enthusiastic or appalled, but never indifferent. I hope their reaction also stimulates them to think about the ideas behind my work.”

From the Artist, "the use of fingers and mouths in my work is full of intent and meaning. The fingers and the mouth are very sensual organs in the human body and are therefore very powerful as separated items from it. The “seamless” combination of these organs in plates or cups, appearing as one, creates, in my opinion, new items that “feel” their environment and respond to it.”

Sources: Ronit Baranga | High Fructose | Bored Panda | Yatzer | Empty Kingdom | Rooms Magazine

Also Check out Ronit Baranga’s other website: Facebook

(via fired-earth)

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mediumaevum:

Would you like to see Globe’s very own cast doing Hamlet in your hometown? 
Join this never before attempted theatrical marvel by donating on Kickstarter. 

On 23 April 2014 the Globe opens its most ambitious tour yet: a two-year tour of Hamlet that will visit every single country on earth. Sixteen extraordinary men and women will travel by boat, train, 4X4, tall ship, bus and aeroplane across the seven continents, performing in a huge range of unique and atmospheric venues – from village squares to national theatres, from palaces to beaches. 

mediumaevum:

Would you like to see Globe’s very own cast doing Hamlet in your hometown? 

Join this never before attempted theatrical marvel by donating on Kickstarter

On 23 April 2014 the Globe opens its most ambitious tour yet: a two-year tour of Hamlet that will visit every single country on earth. Sixteen extraordinary men and women will travel by boat, train, 4X4, tall ship, bus and aeroplane across the seven continents, performing in a huge range of unique and atmospheric venues – from village squares to national theatres, from palaces to beaches.