Rhian Thoms

Art and Ceramics

1,608 notes

girlsgetbusyzine:

Girls Get Busy #22 is finally finished and available online for free HERE

Featuring: Chanelle Adams, Kani Anifowoshi, Monika Ardila, Braudie Blais-Billie, Liz Bowen, Carlin Brown, Dana Burns, Alexandra Bussiere, Emily Smit-Dicks, Maggie Dunlap, Monika Forsberg, Forty Elephants Mob, Mariah Friere, Charlotte Gaffney, Miriam Galea, Emma Gruner, Caitlin Hazell, Hinni Huttunen, Jazmin Jones, Melissa Jones, India K, Aisling Keavey, Olivia Lawler, Lora Li, Maja Malou Lyse, Moira MacLean-Wideman, Nelly Matorina, Ilenia Madelaire, Melissa McElhose, Carol-Anne McFarlane, Madeleine Meunier, Pema Monaghan, Aditi Nagrath, Nuie, Katie Honan Pellico, Laurence Philomene, The Phoney Club, Christina Poku, Rhea Ramakrishnan, Louise Reimer, Leyla Grace Reynolds, Cornelia Van Rijswijk, Elisha Van Rijswijk, Nyssa Sharp, Hannah Siegfied, Beth Siveyer, Nandi La Sophia, Christina Svenson, Elis Talis, Rhian Thoms, Andrea Tirrell, Barbora Togel, Alexandra Urbina, Lin VanderVliet, Emily J. Wang, Haley Winkle

📖 🎨 📖

Curated by Beth Siveyer. Cover art by Nyssa Sharp

Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports artists, writers and musicians.

480 notes

archiemcphee:

Here’s some electrifyingly awesome fashion design that would’ve made Nikola Tesla proud. Dutch designer Anouk Wipprecht created (and modeled) this stunning Faraday Cage Dress, a metal garment capable of conducting nearly one million volts of electricity. The dress is made of metal plates, 600 rings of chain mail, plasma ball epaulets and a helmet covered in metal spikes with a protective face grill.

To construct and successfully model the dress Wipprecht collaborated with ArcAttack, an Austin, TX-based performance art group who use Tesla coils and Faraday suits as part of their act. Wipprecht modeled her Faraday Cage Dress in a dazzling performance at the 2014 Bay Area Maker Faire in May:

"Standing stalwartly between a pair of Tesla coils, electricity arcing around her to the strains of In the Hall of the Mountain King by ArcAttack, Wipprecht remained safe in the confines of her homemade Faraday cage, which distributed the electrical charge around its exterior while shielding the contents within.”

Click here for video footage of the performance, including Anouk Wipprecht’s perspective from inside the suit.

If you’re interested in knowing more about how this phenomenal garment was made, Wipprecht wrote all about it in a detailed Instructables post entitled “How to Get Fashionably Struck by Lightning.” However she cautions amateurs against trying to reproduce the dress one their own:

"If the arcs raise through your heart, you might not live to tell, so if anything, this process was done very carefully," she said. "ArcAttack have been doing this for over 12 years and are specialists in their field."

Head over to Instructables to learn more about this astounding project.

[via Inhabitat and ecouterre]

3,432 notes

archiemcphee:

British-born, Italy-based sculptor Matthew Simmonds is an art-historian-turned-stone-carver who sculpts beautiful architectural interiors inside rough pieces of marble and stone. His pieces look like miniature classical monuments and temples, empty of people, but full of intricate details.

“To create a sculpture that catches the light and structure of a building and lets the eye wander, to feel that here my eye could live, here a part of me could stay, is a great achievement,“ writes Simmonds. “The sculptures give the viewer a different perspective on space. They look different from every viewpoint. You long to be in them, and they seem almost more meaningful for that.“

To view more of Matthew Simmonds’ intricate sculptures click here.

[via Colossal]

77,609 notes

hemelbeestje:

dontwannadeal:

bathsabbath:

piscula:

skooth:

bhavatarini:

myblacksexuality:

poetofwar333:

#cleopatra with the nose knocked off. I wonder if people still think she was European like the movies betray…

I still think it’s one of the most desperate things whites have done to blacks and to black history. The disrespect is outrageous. They came to our country and mentally could not fathom how these black civilizations could be so great. They literally rode through our lands and shot the noses off of our statues. Why? So that the statues would no longer resemble the African people and they could LIE about the origins of Egypt and countless other civilizations. It was a widespread practice. It’s why statues of Pharaoh’s and their wives have no noses. It’s why the Sphinx has no nose. When I was in middle and high school, we were taught that the noses had fell off due to time and poor craftsmanship! They have literally tried to teach us that our ancestors were shitty builders of noses just to hide their malicious destruction of our heritage. European fears of African peoples had to come from somewhere. I want to know what part of the history is missing. There’s something that they don’t want to be told.

The shade is real

i was taught that the noses fell off as well and actually continued to believe this. in retrospect this makes no sense, considering greek/roman statues pretty much always have intact noses whereas egyptian ones are always conveniently missing theirs. thank you for pointing this out to me, i hadn’t even made that connection until now.

The bolded was me too and I am seriously embarrassed that I never even thought about how that could be false.

Damnnn. I hate myself for not realizing this.
    I hate myself even more, since I know the ancient Egyptians created their sculptural works with the idea of permanence in mind. They were literally built to last throughout the afterlife. Notice how the majority of their monumental sculpture is stone-bound, without any protruding elements or breakable appendages. That’s because many of these sculptures were intended to house the life-force (Ka) of those they portrayed. Of their favorite materials were basalt and diorite, both extremely hard stones that were incredibly difficult to carve. Meaning a nose just doesn’t “fall off” because of “poor craftsmanship,” you would literally have to take a hammer to it. Fuckers.

can i get some sources for this? i dont want to walk around telling people this if it is in fact true without sources to back it up. 

just one google will take you to a bunch of sources 👌 😘

hemelbeestje:

dontwannadeal:

bathsabbath:

piscula:

skooth:

bhavatarini:

myblacksexuality:

poetofwar333:

#cleopatra with the nose knocked off. I wonder if people still think she was European like the movies betray…

I still think it’s one of the most desperate things whites have done to blacks and to black history. The disrespect is outrageous. They came to our country and mentally could not fathom how these black civilizations could be so great. They literally rode through our lands and shot the noses off of our statues. Why? So that the statues would no longer resemble the African people and they could LIE about the origins of Egypt and countless other civilizations. It was a widespread practice. It’s why statues of Pharaoh’s and their wives have no noses. It’s why the Sphinx has no nose. When I was in middle and high school, we were taught that the noses had fell off due to time and poor craftsmanship! They have literally tried to teach us that our ancestors were shitty builders of noses just to hide their malicious destruction of our heritage. European fears of African peoples had to come from somewhere. I want to know what part of the history is missing. There’s something that they don’t want to be told.

The shade is real

i was taught that the noses fell off as well and actually continued to believe this. in retrospect this makes no sense, considering greek/roman statues pretty much always have intact noses whereas egyptian ones are always conveniently missing theirs. thank you for pointing this out to me, i hadn’t even made that connection until now.

The bolded was me too and I am seriously embarrassed that I never even thought about how that could be false.

Damnnn. I hate myself for not realizing this.

    I hate myself even more, since I know the ancient Egyptians created their sculptural works with the idea of permanence in mind. They were literally built to last throughout the afterlife. Notice how the majority of their monumental sculpture is stone-bound, without any protruding elements or breakable appendages. That’s because many of these sculptures were intended to house the life-force (Ka) of those they portrayed. Of their favorite materials were basalt and diorite, both extremely hard stones that were incredibly difficult to carve. Meaning a nose just doesn’t “fall off” because of “poor craftsmanship,” you would literally have to take a hammer to it. Fuckers.

can i get some sources for this? i dont want to walk around telling people this if it is in fact true without sources to back it up. 

just one google will take you to a bunch of sources 👌 😘